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World TB Day: 24th March

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Elias Phiri
Member
Posts: 90
World TB Day: 24th March
Posted on: March 23 2012, 03:41 pm

World TB Day, falling on March 24th each year, is designed to build public awareness that tuberculosis today remains an epidemic in much of the world, causing the deaths of several million people each year, mostly in developing countries. We commemorate the day in 1882 when Dr Robert Koch astounded the scientific community by announcing that he had discovered the cause of tuberculosis, the TB bacillus. At the time of Koch's announcement in Berlin, TB was raging through Europe and the Americas, causing the death of one out of every seven people. Koch's discovery opened the way towards diagnosing and curing TB. The theme selected to mark this year's event is "Stop TB in my lifetime" which focuses on a world free of TB in the lifetime of today's children, and a world free of TB deaths in the lifetime of today's adults.

Provisional figures released today by the Health Protection Agency (HPA) show there were 9,042 new cases of tuberculosis (TB) in the UK in 2011. Compared to provisional numbers reported in 2010 (8,587), this is a five per cent increase. The figures, released in the HPA’s annual TB newsletter ahead of World TB Day on Saturday 24 March, show the main burden of this infection is still in London with 3,588 cases reported in 2011, accounting for 40 per cent of the UK total. According to the provisional data, country of origin was recorded in 8,453 new cases, and almost three quarters (6,270) were in non-UK born people.
The HPA has, as in previous years, published a World TB D newsletter which has latest epidemiology of TB in the UK. You can access this newsletter at:
http://www.hpa.org.uk/Topics/InfectiousDiseases/InfectionsAZ/Tuberculosis/ 

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